top of page

Compassionate Coparenting

Compassionate coparenting is beneficial for all parties involved in the parenting relationship, including children, parents, and extended family members. Here are some of the populations that can benefit from compassionate coparenting:

1.     Children: Children of separated or divorced parents can benefit from compassionate coparenting by having a less stressful and more supportive environment in which to grow and develop.

2.     Parents: Parents who adopt a compassionate coparenting approach can improve their relationships with each other and reduce conflict, which can benefit their own well-being.

3.     Extended family members: Extended family members, such as grandparents and other relatives, can benefit from compassionate coparenting by having a more harmonious relationship with their loved ones and being able to provide a stable and supportive environment for the children.

4.     Society: Society as a whole can benefit from compassionate coparenting by having a generation of children who are better equipped to handle relationships and resolve conflicts in a healthy and constructive manner.

Compassionate coparenting can provide a positive and supportive environment for children, parents, and extended family members, which can lead to better outcomes for everyone involved.

 

What research says about compassionate coparenting:

 

There is a growing body of research that suggests that compassionate coparenting can have a number of positive outcomes. Here are some of the key findings from the research:

1.     Reduced conflict: Compassionate coparenting has been shown to reduce conflict between parents, which can create a more stable and supportive environment for children.

2.     Improved well-being: Research has shown that parents who engage in compassionate coparenting are more likely to report higher levels of well-being and lower levels of stress and depression.

3.     Better adjustment for children: Children of separated or divorced parents who engage in compassionate coparenting are more likely to show better adjustment, including better academic performance, stronger relationships with both parents, and lower levels of anxiety and depression.

4.     Improved relationships: Compassionate coparenting can improve relationships between parents, extended family members, and other parties involved in the parenting relationship.

5.     Lower risk of abuse and neglect: Research has also found that children of separated or divorced parents who engage in compassionate coparenting are at a lower risk of abuse and neglect.

These findings suggest that compassionate coparenting can have a number of positive outcomes for children, parents, and extended family members. By reducing conflict, improving well-being, and promoting better relationships, compassionate coparenting can help create a supportive and stable environment for children as they grow and develop.

 

 Steps in compassionate coparenting

Compassionate coparenting is a parenting approach that prioritizes the well-being of children in the aftermath of a divorce or separation. Here are some of the steps involved in compassionate coparenting:

1.     Communicate effectively: Communicate openly, respectfully, and effectively with the other parent about the needs of the children.

2.     Focus on the needs of the children: Put the needs of the children first and make decisions that are in their best interest.

3.     Be flexible: Be willing to be flexible and adapt to changes in circumstances, such as changes in schedules or living arrangements.

4.     Collaborate: Work together with the other parent to make decisions about parenting and to resolve conflicts.

5.     Be supportive: Provide emotional and practical support to the other parent and to the children, even if you disagree on other issues.

6.     Manage conflict: Use conflict resolution strategies to manage disagreements and conflicts in a positive and constructive manner.

7.     Seek support: Seek support from professionals, such as family therapists, mediators, or attorneys, if necessary.

By following these steps, separated or divorced parents can adopt a compassionate coparenting approach that prioritizes the well-being of their children and helps to create a stable and supportive environment for them.

 

 

Some of the areas I focus on in compassionate coparenting are:

  1. Collaboration: Emphasize the importance of working together with the other parent to make decisions and resolve conflicts in a positive and constructive manner.

  2. Nonviolent Communication: Highlight the use of nonviolent communication, which involves expressing needs and feelings in a respectful and non-threatening way.

  3. Less competition: Stress the importance of moving away from a competitive mindset and instead focusing on the needs of the children.

  4. Less criticism: Emphasize the importance of reducing criticism and instead focusing on finding solutions that work for everyone.

  5. More teamwork: Highlight the benefits of working together as a team to create a stable and supportive environment for the children.

 

 

bottom of page